Monday, December 5, 2022

What Shots Should Kittens Get

Don't Miss

When Can You Vaccinate A Kitten

New Kitten? 10 things you NEED to know!

According to the VCA Hospitals, kittens have passive immunity from antibody absorption from their mother through the intestine for 24 to 48 hours after birth. This protects them against disease during the first few weeks of life but they need to build longer-lasting active immunity in order to remain protected against these diseases. Vaccines promote active immunity, but they must be given at the correct time.

Because it’s impossible to predict when a kitten will lose its short-term immunity, a series of vaccines spaced at regular intervals boost the cat’s chances of developing active immunity. The aim is to administer at least two vaccines during the critical window after the kitten loses maternal immunity before exposure to infectious disease.

Kittens need vaccine boosters every one to three years to maintain active, long-lasting immunity.

Talk to your veterinarian about your kittens lifestyle and discuss their kitten vaccination schedule to determine whats best for your pet.

Kitten Vaccination Schedule And Costs

Kittens are most susceptible to infectious diseases when they are under 6 months of age. Thats why its so important to give your kitten the protection they need with the right vaccinations.

Mother cats pass maternal antibodies through their milk during nursing. These antibodies do offer some degree of protection against diseases, but they also interfere with, or even inactivate, the bodys response to vaccination.

For this reason, core kitten vaccinations start at 6-8 weeks of age and are boosted every 3-4 weeks until the kitten is 16-20 weeks old. Core vaccines should be boosted one year after the initial series.

Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis Calicivirus And Panleukopenia

This is a combination vaccine for the three viruses, and it is often referred to as a distemper shot for cats.

Kitten Schedule

The vaccine is first given between 6 and 8 weeks of age. It is then boostered every 3 to 4 weeks until 16 to 18 weeks of age.

This vaccine used to be repeated 1 year later. However, due to the current recommendation of WSAVA, it is recommended to repeat this vaccine at 6 months of age. This is due to the fact that one third of kittens have mother-derived antibodies up until 20 weeks of age. Therefore, the immunity from the vaccine is blocked by the presence of the mother’s immunity if not given after that point. The vaccine is then administered every 3 years after that.

Adult Cat Schedule

For cats receiving this “distemper” vaccine combination, as non-kittens, a series of two vaccines is given and then boostered a year later. They will then receive a booster every 3 years.

Read Also: What Are The Best Cat Foods

Vaccines Your Kitten Should Have

tags

Adopting a new kitten means going through many milestones together, including bringing your cat home for the first time, litter training her and introducing her to other animals to name a few. Other important first steps will take place in your veterinarian’s office. From vaccinations to spaying and neutering, being a new pet parent comes with new responsibilities.

To help you prepare, here’s a list of the most common kitten vaccinations vets recommend and why they’re important for your new family member. Educate yourself first, and then work with your vet to create a vaccine schedule right for your family.

How Much Do Titers Cost

Cat Vaccination Schedule &  Cost

Oftentimes, titers can be more expensive than the vaccine. For example, a feline core vaccine titer can cost $70 to $100, whereas the vaccine costs $30 to $60.

There is always the chance that the titer will indicate that your cat will still need to be vaccinated, and there will be the possible added expense of an office visit in addition to the cost of the vaccine. Plus, there is the additional time involved to bring your cat back.

It is important to discuss with your veterinarian if they recommend your cat be re-vaccinated or have a titer done.

Each cat has unique needs, lifestyles, and risk factors. Your veterinarian is your best resource to help you make the right vaccine decisions for your cat.

Read Also: Cat Litter For Declawed Cats

What If I Made A Mistake In My Fafsa

If you made a mistake filling out your application, you need to correct your FAFSA form. You can do this by logging in with your FSA ID, go to the My FAFSA page and select make corrections.

In some instances, if the changes cannot be done through the FAFSA portal, students will need to reach out to their institutions financial aid office to make corrections.

Can I Trim My Kitten’s Toenails

Kittens have very sharp toenails that can wreak havoc on cat owners and their furniture. You can trim your kittens nails with your regular fingernail clippers or with nail trimmers specifically designed for cats, but you must do so carefully. If you take too much off the nail, you will cut into the quick which will result in bleeding and pain.

Here are a few helpful pointers:

  • Cats often have clear or white nails, so you can see the pink quick through the nail. This is a small pink triangle visible near the base of the nail. If you avoid this pink area, you should be safely away from the quick.
  • When cutting toenails, use sharp trimmers. Dull trimmers tend to pinch or crush the nail and cause pain even if you are not in the quick. A good set of human nail trimmers are often sufficient. Many larger clippers meant for dogs do not trim cats nails well and can cause splintering of the nails.
  • Have styptic powder on hand in case bleeding occurs. These products can be purchased from pet stores or your veterinarian. In an emergency, a bar of soap can be used to help stop the bleeding.
  • Playing with your kittens feet and rewarding her with treats after nail trims is a good way to help encourage good behavior for future nail trims.

If you are unsure about trimming your kittens nails, ask your veterinary healthcare professionals for help. They can teach you how to make the procedure easy and painless for you and your kitten.

Read Also: Why Is My Cat Licking My Blanket

Fafsa Season Starts: What You Need To Know For Financial Aid

NEW YORK The Free Application for Federal Student Aid filing season starts Oct. 1 for the 2023-2024 school year. If you plan to attend college next year, experts say you might want to fill out the FAFSA application as close to the opening date as possible.

Many institutions award financial aid on a first-come, first-serve basis. Karen McCarthy, vice president of public policy and federal relations from the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, recommends students get started.

It is a good idea to do it on the earlier side, said McCarthy. Whenever run out of money, then thats all the funding they have for the year.

Whether this is your first or fifth time filling out the application, here are some recommendations and background for completing this process and getting financial aid for your college career.

Vaccination Schedule For Kittens

Are You Thinking Of Adopting A Kitten From A Shelter? | Cats 101

The Spruce / Ellen Lindner

Your new kitten deserves the best start in life. This means providing everything she needs to grow and stay healthy. Vaccines are an important part of your kitten’s health care plan. Basic immunizations are essential to prevent your kitten from getting sick and avoid the spread of disease.

Also Check: Oriental Shorthair Kittens For Adoption

When Should I Schedule Kitten Vaccinations And Cat Vaccinations

You should schedule your kitten vaccinations as soon as you get your new kitten. Regardless of the age, your new kitten should be seen by a veterinarian as soon as possible. It is important to get a preventive health care plan in place including vaccinations, deworming and flea control. In addition, we will spend time discussing behavioral training to make sure your kitten develops good behaviors and becomes a great pet.

Plan on spending at least thirty minutes at your first visit. This is a great time to get all your questions answered on kitten care and discuss the recommended preventive program with our veterinary team.

An adult cat vaccination schedule, which includes periodic booster immunizations, will be scheduled one year after the kitten vaccination schedule has been completed.

As with any other immunization protocol, a cat vaccination schedule should be adhered to without deviation, in order to ensure your cat remains healthy and well for the duration of his or her life. We cannot control all health issues but we can prevent the majority of infectious disease with the proper vaccine schedule.

Important Cat Vaccinations Your Feline Needs

At Animal General, a veterinarian in Manhattan, we care about the relationship you have with your pet. That’s why we take extra care to make sure you’re taking the best possible care of them that you can. We know it’s important to have your cat vaccinated against common illnesses to help them live a long and healthy life. When you visit our office for cat vaccinations, here’s what we’ll cover.

Also Check: How To Introduce Cats And Dogs

What Are Ear Mites

Ear mites are tiny parasites that live in the ear canal of cats where they cause itching. The most common sign of ear mite infection is vigorous and persistent scratching of the ears or shaking of the head. Sometimes the outer ear canal will appear dirty and contain black debris.

Your veterinarian will examine the ear canal with an otoscope that magnifies the tiny mites, or will take a small sample of the black debris and examine it under a microscope. Although the mites may crawl out of the ear canals for short periods, they spend the majority of their lives within the protection of the ear canal.

Ear mites are easily transmitted between cats and dogs by direct contact. Kittens will usually become infected if their mother has ear mites. If one pet in the household has ear mites, it is advised to treat all of your pets. Successive applications of topical medication to the kittens ear or skin will eliminate ear mites .

Are Kitten Vaccinations And Cat Vaccinations Necessary

Cat Vaccinations, Core and Non

The answer is yes. A kitten or cat owner is responsible for the wellbeing of their feline friend – this includes happiness and longevity of life. Cat vaccinations are integral component in the longevity equation. Kitten vaccinations and cat vaccinations are medically and scientifically proven to prevent various insidious diseases.

Recommended Reading: How To Treat Dry Skin On Cats

When Should My Kitten Receive Their First Shots

You should bring your kitten to see your vet for their first round of vaccinations when they are about six to eight weeks old. Following this, your kitten should get a series of vaccines at three-to-four week intervals until they reach approximately 16 weeks old.

Kitten Vaccination Schedule

First visit

  • Review nutrition and grooming
  • Blood test for feline leukemia
  • Fecal exam for parasites
  • Vaccinations for chlamydia, calicivirus, rhinotracheitis and panleukopenia

Second visit

  • Examination and external check for parasites
  • First feline leukemia vaccine
  • Second vaccinations for calicivirus rhinotracheitis, and panleukopenia
  • First feline leukemia vaccine

Third visit

  • Second feline leukemia vaccine

How Often Does My Kitten Need To Be Vaccinated

Kitten Vaccination Schedule:

  • 6-8 weeks Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis Calici Virus Panleukopenia
  • 12 weeks Booster vaccines for all of the above
  • 16 weeks Booster vaccines for all of the above + Rabies Vaccine

Optional vaccine based on risk and exposure:

  • Feline Leukemia Vaccine

Note: All the feline vaccines that we administer are Purevax vaccines. The Rabies and the Feline Leukemia vaccines are recombinant and are considered the safest for cats.

You May Like: How To Remove Cat Pee From Carpet

If I Choose To Breed My Cat When Should I Start

There are many kittens that need adoption, so unless you have specific plans for the kittens, breeding is not recommended. Even if you find homes for all of the kittens, those homes are then no longer available for the many cats and kittens that need adopting from shelters.

If you decide to breed your cat, she should be at least one year old. This will allow her to mature physically and minimize the physical demands of pregnancy. Many breeds have preexisting genetic conditions. This needs to be considered and screened for before breeding can occur. Speak with your veterinarian to make sure you practice responsible breeding techniques.

Frequency Of Vaccinations For Adult Cats And Boarding Facility Requirements

How To Raise A Kitten

The frequency of feline booster vaccinations varies from 1-3 years depending on the vaccine, the disease, and the risk of disease exposure to the individual cat. In general, it is recommended by expert panels on feline vaccination that cats who stay at a boarding cattery require an annual vaccination schedule as this can be a higher risk situation than a normal home environment . This is because boarding may be stressful for a cat and stress has immunosuppressive effects which may result in increased susceptibility to infection and disease and additionally there can be a higher risk of exposure to infectious disease.

For these reasons, it is still recommended that a cat should have a vaccination within 12 months of entering a boarding facility, and why almost all cat boarding facilities require cats to have received a vaccination booster within 12 months prior to admission to the facility.

It is best to speak to your vet about your cats individual needs. Your veterinarian will always do a health check before administering a vaccination to ensure your kitten or cat is healthy to be vaccinated. In addition, this provides an excellent opportunity for your veterinarian to fully examine your cat and discuss any health issues. This allows any health concerns that your cat may have to be addressed as early as possible, giving your cat the best chance possible to be healthy and comfortable.

You May Like: How Long Do Cats Live Up To

Why Should I Get My Indoor Cat Vaccinated

Though you may not think your indoor cat requires vaccinations, by law cats must have certain vaccinations in many states. For example, a common law requires cats over the age of 6 months to be vaccinated against rabies. In return for the vaccinations, your veterinarian will provide you with a vaccination certificate, which should be stored in a safe place.

When considering your cats health, its always prudent to be cautious, as cats are often curious by nature. Our vets recommend core vaccinations for indoor cats to protect them against diseases they could be exposed to if they happen to escape the safety of your home.

Cat Vaccines

There are two basic types of vaccinations for cats.

Core vaccinations should be given to all cats, as they are essential for protecting them against the following common but serious feline conditions:

Rabies

Rabies kills many mammals every year. These vaccinations are required by law for cats in most states.

Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus and Panleukopenia Typically known as the distemper shot, this combination vaccine protects against feline viral rhinotracheitis, calicivirus and panleukopenia.

Feline herpesvirus type I

Non-core vaccinations are appropriate for some cats depending on their lifestyle. Your vet will provide advice about which non-core vaccines your cat should have. These offer protection against:

Feline immunodeficiency virus and Feline Leukemia

Bordetella

Chlamydophila felis

Why Should I Have My Female Cat Spayed

Spaying young cats offers several advantages:

  • Your cat will avoid heat periods, which usually begin at six to seven months of age and occur every two to three weeks in an unbred cat. During the heat period, female cats encourage the attention of male cats. The female cat will posture and vocalize, which can be annoying to owners so too can the presence of neighborhood male cats that mark the territory outside your house and fight off other suitors. Sometimes the natural urge to mate is so strong that your indoor cat will attempt to escape outdoors to breed.
  • Spaying prevents unplanned litters of kittens that often never find suitable homes.
  • Spaying prior to the first heat cycle greatly reduces the risk of breast cancer.
  • Spaying prevents cancers or infections of the reproductive organs.

Spaying a cat may be a common procedure, but all surgery must be taken seriously. The correct term for spaying is ovariohysterectomy, and refers to the complete removal of the uterus and ovaries under general anesthesia. An overnight stay in the hospital may be advised to allow close monitoring during recovery and provide adequate pain control .

Don’t Miss: What To Do With Feral Kittens

Why Your Indoor Cat Needs To Be Vaccinated

Many states have laws that make certain vaccinations mandatory for cats, even if you think your indoor kitty doesn’t require them. As an example, lots of states have a law stating that all cats must be given the rabies vaccine by the time they are 6 months old. After your cat receives their vaccine your vet will provide you with a certificate that states your cat was given the required shots.

There is 2 types of vaccines that are available for cats one is ‘core vaccines’ the other is ‘lifestyle vaccines’.

Veterinarians recommend that all indoor cats should be given core vaccinations to keep them protected from a large range of extremely contagious diseases, so they are safe from illnesses if they escape from your house, go for a grooming or if they have to stay at a boarding facility, etc.

The Problem With Titers

Pet Vaccinations in Reno, NV Fairgrounds Animal Hospital

Typically, vaccines are given every year. With titers, there is no way to predict what the levels will be in three to six months, even if they tested high at the time of the titer testing. Many factors can affect the immune system and its level of resistance. Factors such as disease, stress, or medications can impact it, and therefore there is no consistency over time regarding what the antibody levels could be. This could put your cat at risk until you go in for another titer test.

Recommended Reading: How To Tell What Animal Killed My Cat

More articles

Popular Articles